European Parliament calls for urgent action on land access and concentration in Europe!

logo-eurovia.pngPress release

Brussels, 27 April 2017

The path to fairer land governance in Europe reached a milestone today, as the European Parliament approved an own initiative report that recognizes the urgent problems of land concentration, and access to land in the EU and demands for adequate responses. 

The European Coordination Via Campesina (ECVC) and the Hands on The Land (HOtL) coalition welcome the adoption of the report, "State of play of farmland concentration in the EU: how to facilitate the access to land for farmers?", and assert that the time has come to change Europe's land policy. The report, voted in plenary today, could potentially serve as a starting point to develop regulation at the European level to prevent land grabbing by large (often non farming) companies, land concentration and to facilitate access to land for small scale farmers and new entrants to farming. Some of the main demands of peasant organizations and civil society included in the report were:

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"3% of the farms control 50% of the arable lands in the EU": Kaya Thomas at the FAO workshop on implementation of VGGT

2016-12-14 Kaya Thomas AbL.jpgAt the FAO Workshop on the Implementation of Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure (VGGT), held in Budapest Hungary, Kaya Thomas from Arbeitsgemeinschaft bäuerliche Landwirtschaft (AbL) /ECVC spoke at length about land fragmentation, collapsing rural infrastructure and contradictory land laws. Here is the full text of her speech that she delivered on behalf of CSOs and social movements.

Dear colleagues and friends, 

My name is Kaya Thomas. I finished my agricultural apprenticeship in the north of Germany and am currently studying law. I am a member of the AbL, which stands for “Working Group on Peasant Agriculture”, the German member of the European Coordination Via Campesina. I work on issues related to land distribution, access to seeds, and support for young farmers.

Read more: "3% of the farms control 50% of the arable...

Statement from the Popular University of Social Movements Workshop held at Harare

Land, seeds, food, water, people and the climate in SADC - 15 years after the agrarian reform in Zimbabwe

b_350_0_16777215_00_images_2016-08-11_UPMS5.JPGHarare (Zimbabwe)

12 -14 July 2016 

Preamble

Over the past 15 years, Zimbabwe's fast track land reform programme redressed colonial land inequalities and now provides lessons for its neighbours on how to democratise land ownership and broaden economic participation. From July 12-14 2016, various social movements and academics from Zimbabwe, Mozambique, South Africa, Ivory Coast, Spain and Portugal gathered in Zimbabwe's capital, Harare to discuss and debate the state of land, seeds, food, climate and people in Southern Africa. The event was being held under the banner/auspices of the Popular University of Social Movements, known by its Portuguese and Spanish acronym, UPMS. 

Read more: Statement from the Popular University of Social...

ZIMSOFF co-organises a dialogue on the state of land, seeds and food with allies

2016-07-11-UPMS-Media advisory.jpgPopular University of Social Movements gathers in Harare: social movements and academics to dialogue on the state of land, seeds and food in SADC

MEDIA ADVISORY

(Harare, July 11, 2016) – Over the past 15 years, Zimbabwe's fast track land reform programme has redressed colonial land inequalities and now provides lessons for its neighbours on how to democratise land ownership and broaden economic participation. From July 12-15, various social movements and academics from Zimbabwe, Mozambique, South Africa, Ghana, Spain and Portugal will gather in Zimbabwe's capital, Harare to discuss and debate the state of land, seeds, food, climate and people in Southern Africa. The event is being held under the banner/auspices of Portugal's Popular University of Social Movements, known by its Portuguese acronym, UPMS.

Social movements have powerfully influenced Zimbabwe's land reform, and movements' role in pressuring governments for land reform is today more important than ever. The Southern African region's food deficit has risen in the past five years due to limited agricultural support by the state and climate linked weather vagaries. Land investments and changes to seed laws and the growing impacts of climate change are also shaping regional food security.

Read more: ZIMSOFF co-organises a dialogue on the state of...

Additional information